American English Idioms Lessons

Welcome to our American English Idioms lessons where you can learn American English Idioms in a fun, easy, and interactive way. With each lesson, you will be able to read and watch and translate into numerous languages sets of 3 popular American English Idioms. Each lesson includes a fun and educational video where you can watch, read and listen to American English Idiom videos that include sets of 3 idioms. English Learners: Now you can learn American English Idioms in a fun and easy way. Just watch the video several times, read and translate the text into your primary language, if needed, and practice using these idioms when speaking and writing in American English. You are invited to participate by adding sentences with idioms in the comments section at the bottom of each lesson.

Here are our American English Lessons, courtesy of www.AmericanEnglishIdioms.com

Click on the links below to access the American English Lessons:

  1. ACE IN THE HOLE, ACE UP (ONE’S) SLEEVE, and ACHILLES’ HEEL: American English Idioms #1
  2. ACID TEST, ACROSS THE BOARD, and ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS: American English Idioms #2
  3. ALBATROSS AROUND (ONE’S) NECK, ALL KIDDING ASIDE, and ALL THUMBS: American English Idioms #3
  4. ALL WET, ALONG FOR THE RIDE, GO/COME, and APPLE OF (ONE’S) EYE: American English Idioms #4
  5. ARMED TO THE TEETH, AS THE CROW FLIES, and AT LOGGERHEADS: American English Idioms #5
  6. AT (ONE’S) WITS’ END, AT THE DROP OF A HAT, and AT THE END OF (ONE’S) ROPE: American English Idioms #6
  7. AX TO GRIND, BACK TO SQUARE ONE, GO, and BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD, GO: American English Idioms #7
  8. BACK TO THE WALL, HAVE (ONE’S), BACKHANDED COMPLIMENT, AND BACK-SEAT DRIVER: American English Idioms #8
  9. BAD BLOOD, BARK UP THE WRONG TREE, and BATS IN (ONE’S) BELFRY, HAVE: American English Idioms #9
  10. BEAT A DEAD HORSE, BEAT A HASTY RETREAT, BEAT ABOUT/AROUND THE BUSH: American English Idioms #10
  11. BEAT (SOMEONE) TO THE PUNCH, BEAT THE BUSHES, BEHIND THE EIGHT BALL: American English Idioms #11
  12. BELOW THE BELT, HIT (SOMEONE), BEND (SOMEONE’S) EAR, and BESIDE (ONESELF): American English Idioms #12
  13. BESIDE THE POINT, BET (ONE’S) BOOTS, and BET (ONE’S) BOTTOM DOLLAR: American English Idioms #13
  14. BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE, BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA, and BEYOND THE PALE: American English Idioms #14
  15. BIG CHEESE, BIG FISH IN A SMALL POND, and BIG SHOT: American English Idioms #15
  16. BIG WHEEL, BIGWIG, and BIRD’S EYE VIEW: American English Idioms #16
  17. BITE OFF MORE THAN (ONE) CAN CHEW, BITE THE BULLET, and BITE THE DUST: American English Idioms #17
  18. BITTER/HARD PILL TO SWALLOW, BLACK AND BLUE, and BLACK MARKET: American English Idioms #18
  19. BLACK OUT, BLACK SHEEP, and BLACK TIE: American English Idioms #19
  20. BLOW (ONE’S) OWN HORN, BLOW (ONE’S) STACK, and BLOW/RUN HOT AND COLD: American English Idioms #20
  21. BLOW OFF STEAM, BLUE, and BLUE-BLOOD: American English Idioms #21
  22. BLUE LAW, BLUE RIBBON, and BLUE-COLLAR WORKER: American English Idioms #22
  23. BOILING POINT, BOMB, and BONE OF CONTENTION: American English Idioms #23
  24. A Bone to Pick, Born Yesterday, Both Feet on the Ground: American English Idioms #24
  25. BOTTOM LINE, THE, BOTTOM OF THE BARREL, BOTTOMS UP! : American English Idioms #25
  26. BOXED IN/BOX (SOMEONE) IN, BRAINSTORM, BREADWINNER: American English Idioms #26
  27. BREAK THE ICE, BRING DOWN THE HOUSE, BRING HOME THE BACON: American English Idioms #27
  28. BRUSH-OFF, GET/GIVE (SOMEONE) THE, BUG, BULL IN A CHINA SHOP: American English Idioms #28
  29. BUM STEER, GIVE SOMEONE A, BURN (ONE’S) BRIDGES, BURN RUBBER: American English Idioms #29
  30. BURN THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS, BURN THE MIDNIGHT OIL,BURNED OUT: American English Idioms #30
  31. BURNING QUESTION, BURY THE HATCHET, BUTT IN: American English Idioms #31
  32. BUTTER (SOMEONE) UP, BUY (SOMETHING) FOR A SONG, BY HOOK OR BY CROOK: American English Idioms #32
  33. BY THE BOOK, GO, BY THE SEAT OF (ONE’S) PANTS, DO (SOMETHING),BY THE SKIN OF (ONE’S) TEETH: American English Idioms #33
  34. BY WORD OF MOUTH, CALL (SOMEONE) ON THE CARPET, CALL (SOMEONE’S) BLUFF: American English Idioms #34
  35. CALL A SPADE A SPADE, CALL THE SHOTS, CAN OF WORMS, OPEN A: American English Idioms #35
  36. CARRY A TORCH (FOR SOMEONE), CARRY THE BALL, CAST PEARLS BEFORE SWINE: American English Idioms #36
  37. CATCH (SOMEONE) RED-HANDED [GET CAUGHT-RED HANDED], CATCH (SOMEONE’S) EYE, CATCH (SOMEONE’S) FANCY: American English Idioms #37
  38. CHANGE HORSES IN MIDSTREAM, CHANGE OF HEART, CHARMED LIFE, LEAD A: American English Idioms #38
  39. CHECKERED PAST, CHEW (SOMEONE) OUT [GET CHEWED OUT], CHEW (SOMETHING) OVER: American English Idioms #39
  40. CHICKEN, CHICKEN OUT, CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK, A: American English Idioms #40
  41. CHIP ON (ONE’S) SHOULDER, CLAM UP, CLEAN SLATE [WIPE THE SLATE CLEAN]: American English Idioms #41
  42. CLEAN (SOMEONE) OUT, CLEAR THE AIR, CLIMB THE WALLS: American English Idioms #42
  43. CLIMB/JUMP ON THE BANDWAGON, CLOSE SHAVE, CLOSED-MINDED: American English Idioms #43
  44. CLOWN AROUND, COCK-AND-BULL STORY, COLD FEET: American English Idioms #44
  45. COLD TURKEY, COME FULL CIRCLE, COME HOME TO ROOST: American English Idioms #45
  46. COME OFF IT!, COME OUT OF (ONE’S) SHELL, COME OUT SMELLING LIKE A ROSE: American English Idioms #46
  47. COOK (SOMEONE’S) GOOSE, COOK UP, COOL (ONE’S) HEELS: American English Idioms #47
  48. CORNERED, COST (SOMEONE) A MINT/ AN ARM AND A LEG, COUCH POTATO: American English Idioms #48
  49. CREAM OF THE CROP, CROCODILE TEARS, CROSS (ONE’S) FINGERS: American English Idioms #49
  50. CRY OVER SPILLED MILK, CRY/SAY UNCLE, CRY WOLF: American English Idioms #50
  51. CUT AND DRIED, CUT CORNERS, CUT OFF (ONE’S) NOSE TO SPITE (ONE’S) FACE: American English Idioms #51
  52. CUT (SOMEONE) TO THE QUICK, CUT THE MUSTARD, DAMN (SOMEONE) WITH FAINT PRAISE: American English Idioms #52

What are American English Idioms?

— An American English idiom is slang that is used in the United States. These phrases are usually regional and not specific to one region. These idioms can be seen in everyday speech, but also show up in literature. Some common phrases are “saved by the bell,” “beat around the bush,” “taken aback,” and many more. The phrase “saved by the bell” is often seen on television shows when someone narrowly escapes something bad happening by mere seconds.

— American English idioms are colloquial expressions that are both unique to and ubiquitous in American English. A traditional example of an idiom is “raining cats and dogs,” which refers to an extremely heavy rain storm. Idioms often play on words, such as “John likes his coffee hot” (meaning he likes it very strong) or “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” (meaning someone who is set in their ways won’t change).

— Ordinarily, American English idioms are sayings that have a meaning other than the literal interpretation. These idiomatic expressions may have originally been constructed as a joke or as a reference to an event in history. Some common American English idioms include “that’s a horse of a different color,” “dead as a doornail,” and “a pig in a poke.

— An idiom is a word or phrase that has a peculiar meaning that is different from the conventional usage of the word. This can be applied to both literal and figurative meanings. For example, “a slap on the wrist” means a light punishment for some minor offense while “to get slapped with a lawsuit” means to get charged with an infraction of more serious magnitude.

— American English idioms are expressions whose meaning cannot be determined from the words in the expression alone. These include phrases such as “don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater” or “if you can’t beat them, join them.” These are often metaphors to describe concepts that are difficult to explain in any other way.

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